News

The Solar Physics Division (SPD) of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) has awarded the 2021 Karen Harvey Prize for significant contributions to the study of the Sun early in a person's professional career to Dr. Lucia Kleint, who until very recently was leading the GREGOR telescope and the Tenerife Observatory group at KIS.

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In the last months, the EST Project Office at IAC and the review panel of the EST Science Advisory Group chaired by Rolf Schlichenmaier from KIS has worked on the definition of the EST light distribution system and instrument suite, using the guidelines laid down by the Science Requirement Document.

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Dr. Reiner Hammer passed away on 18th of June 2020 after suffering a short serious illness, just a few weeks before his 70th birthday.

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On May 26, 2020, Dr. Andrei Gorobets very successfully defended his PhD thesis on the "Stochastic analysis of the quiet Sun magnetic field evolution" at Freiburg University. He was awarded a summa cum laude grade for his thesis.

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The Mouse was back! Finally, on October 3, 2019, Schauinsland Observatory opened its doors to the very young. This was the seventh time that the German television children’s series “The Show with the Mouse” invited children from age 6 and their families to visit the observatory.

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Recent data published

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As from now, the name of the institute is Leibniz-Institut für Sonnenphysik (KIS) (Leibniz Institute for Solar Physics (KIS). This name change was agreed to highlight the institute’s membership in the Leibniz Association.

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The European Union member states, recognising the challenges of data driven research in pursuing excellent science, have launched the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC) initiative.

EOSC is a cloud for research data in Europe allowing for universal access to data through a single online platform. EOSC will federate existing resources across national data centres, e-infrastructures and research infrastructures allowing researchers and citizens to access and re-use data produced by other scientists. EOSC success is based on continuous engagement with scientific stakeholders actively supporting its implementation and in their respective capacities.

ESCAPE (European Science Cluster of Astronomy & Particle physics ESFRI research infrastructures) aims to address the Open Science challenges shared by ESFRI facilities (CTA, ELT, EST, FAIR, HL-LHC, KM3NeT, SKA) as well as other pan-European research infrastructures (CERN, ESO, JIV-ERIC, EGO-Virgo) in astronomy and particle physics research domains.

The complexity of all this new apparatus in science grows rapidly, the data volume produced by them is seeing a tremendous increase and the software to analyse the data is becoming more and more complex. On the other hand, this data should be accessible to the growing scientific communities, as they collaborate and interact. The ESCAPE project brings together partners from astronomy and particle physics to collaborate on building the EOSC. The ESCAPE actions aim at delivering solutions to ensure integration of data, tools, services and scientific software; to foster common approaches to implement open-data stewardship; to establish interoperability within EOSC as an integrated multi-probe facility for fundamental science.

 

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Suchen Sie nach einem Thema für eine Bachelor-Arbeit? Wir bieten einige aktuelle Themen an. Sie finden Informationen dazu unter Lehre in der Rubrik Examensarbeiten.

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Franz-Ludwig Deubner passed away on 21 October 2017 in Freiburg. He had been a member of the Editorial Board of Solar Physics and President of IAU Commission 12 Solar Radiation & Structure. His accomplishments and many contributions to the field of solar physics are well remembered.

 

Franz was born on 2 June 1934 in Berlin, Germany. His father Alex was a physicist, his mother Louise (née Wegener) a pianist. After graduating from a “Humanistisches Gymnasium”, Franz studied physics and mathematics at the Technical University of Berlin (1953 – 1956) and the University of Freiburg (1956 – 1958), where he received his “Diplom” in 1958. He then joined the scientific staff at the Fraunhofer Institute in Freiburg (since 1978 called Kiepenheuer Institute), where he built a vector magnetograph for the institute’s Schauinsland observatory (1959 – 1960). In 1962 K.O. Kiepenheuer started the expansion of the institute’s Capri Station, for which Franz developed a new magnetograph. It was installed at the new domeless Coudé refractor in 1966. Franz had not only designed this architecturally remarkable telescope (together with his wife), he had also programmed the Siemens control computer of the telescope and magnetograph, a novelty in astronomy at that time. A key component of this magnetograph was the “Doppler-Kompensator”, an electro-mechanical control mechanism that kept the spectral line centered on a pair of photomultipliers, allowing a precise measurement of the linear and circular polarization of the line. The angle of the rotating glass plate of this device provided an excellent measure of the line’s Doppler shift, and Franz began to study the recently discovered solar oscillations in more detail. Franz received his PhD in January 1969, based on data obtained with this instrument.

 

Probably his most profound contribution to the field of solar physics was his seminal 1975 paper (...

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